Classic Cars That Hold Their Value

The Classic Car market has steadily grown in value since a price crash in the early 90’s, although not all makes and models have experienced the same degrees of success.

Published: 24th November 2015

The Classic Car market has steadily grown in value since a price crash in the early 90’s, although not all makes and models have experienced the same degrees of success.

Most vintage vehicles are something of a sure thing – or at least likely to hold their value if not increase it to some degree. As these vehicles become older and rarer, so they seemingly become more desirable to the collector and investor alike. Here at ALA GAP Insurance, we’ve compiled five of the most interesting classic cars that have held or improved on their value over the last 50 years, just for you!

1. The 1961 Austin Mk 1 Mini Cooper S

Most famously appearing in the classic film The Italian Job, the Mini Cooper S has cemented its place in the British motoring consciousness. Selling over 5 million models between 1959 and the official end of production in 2000, Minis are not exactly rare. They are, however, treasured. Originally selling for £497, a pre-owned model will now cost anywhere from £15,000 to £45,000 depending on condition and mileage. Considered amongst the three most iconic vehicles in film history, a classic Mini is unlikely to be a bad investment.

2. The 1960 Jaguar Mk2

From the dilapidated almost-scrap car that transports ‘Withnail and I’ to the Lake District to the chosen transport for Inspector Morse, the Jaguar Mk2 Saloon has always been a vehicle that stands out amongst other models from the same era. Produced for only ten years, the Mk2 was incredibly successful as both a motorsport touring car, and the chosen vehicle for get-away drivers due to its top speed and spacious cabin capable of accommodating a number of adults and loot. Originally sold for approximately £1,344, they can now be found from £29,000 and up depending on condition.

3. The 1968 Ford Mustang GT Fastback

Driven by Steve McQueen in the 1968 film Bullitt, the Mustang GT is the embodiment of American muscle cars and styling. Featuring in the film’s 7-minute long car chase through San Francisco, it is considered to be one of the greatest car chases of all time and has been endlessly imitated ever since. Big, brash and loud, these cars originally sold for around £1,500 and are now worth £40,000 and up depending on mileage, condition and (more importantly than you’d think) colour. Maybe a bit brash for Britain’s roads, but certainly memorable!

4. The 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California

Famously crashed backwards through a window in the 1986 blockbuster Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, the Ferrari 250 GT is one of the most prestigious cars on this list (or any other Classic Car list for that matter!). With only 55 built, its rarity and extremely attractive styling only push today’s prices up and up. A beautiful example recently went for over £22 million at auction – setting a new world record in the process and it seems unlikely that prices will continue to do anything except rise.

5. The 1963 Aston Martin DB5

It doesn’t really need an introduction. The most iconic Bond car by far, and one of the most iconic British cars, it is routinely voted as the most memorable and most coveted vehicle in film history. The DB5, then, is something special. Built between 1963 and 1965, only 1,023 models were ever produced in a small variety of designs. Originally “only” £4,175, a DB5 in almost any condition is now worth anywhere between £500,000 and over £1 million.

Hopefully this list will have drawn you to the prospect of classic car ownership as a means of investment. These are just a few examples of classics that have held, and indeed increased, their value well over the last 50 years and will probably continue to do so over the next 50 as numbers diminish even further and rarity pushes interest even higher. For those of you considering an investment, remember to do your homework and you could be on to the next record-breaker!

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Published: 24th November 2015
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